Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (2022)

Review - William Optics Binoviewers

Posted: 8 November 2014

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (2)Binoviewer
$258
William Optics

While helping out in the OPT booth at the Arizona Science & Astronomy Expo, 1-2 November 2014, I purchased a William Optics Binoviewers from OPT. One of the OPT employees in the booth had high praise for the WO Binoviewers so I decided it would make a nice addition to my visual accessories.

This review will discuss using the William Optics Binoviewers on two telescopes: my 8" LX200-ACF in the observatory and my ETX-105PE.


The binoviewers, two included 20mm eyepieces (66° AFOV; Wide Angle), and a 1.6X Barlow Lens are nicely packed in foam inside the box:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (3)

It also includes caps for all holes. However, only one end cap is provided for the Barlow Lens, which seemed odd. There is no instruction sheet, although a sheet describing the two year warranty is included.

8" LX200-ACF

I mounted the binoviewers on the 8" telescope using a 2" star diagonal with a 1.25" eyepiece adapter, as seen here:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (4)

Just as with binoculars, you can adjust the eyepieces separation for individual eye-to-eye distance. I slewed to the moon and rotated the entire binoviewers for comfortable viewing. Next, I focused the right eyepiece using the telescope focus knob. The left eyepiece was then focused by rotating its eyepiece holder (the right one can also be focused by rotating its holder). With both eyepieces in-focus I could see that focus was excellent over the entire field-of-view (FOV) at 100X.

And oh wow, what a view of the moon! It was no longer just a flat surface, but had a very obvious "globe" look to it. Of course, the 3D effect is just an illusion from using both eyes. Along the terminator the views were absolutely incredible.

I added the Barlow Lens, which screws onto the 1.25" nosepiece using the filter threads. (The Barlow Lens will also accept a filter.) Lunar details at 160X were amazing. Hills and mountains really looked like they were extending upward from the lunar surface. I definitely have a new favorite way to view the moon! Using the binoviewers I will be rediscovering what our moon has to offer.

My next object was M57 (Ring Nebula) at 160X. Even though the sky was bright due to a waxing gibbous moon, the Ring Nebula was easily seen using both eyes. In fact, it seemed slightly brighter with both eyes vs viewing through one eye alone without using binoviewers. Just another of the benefits of using a binoviewer. At 100X (no Barlow Lens), M57 was a pretty sight. But the brightening effect was less apparent at 100X. I also viewed M45 (Pleiades), low in the eastern sky. The view of individual stars was good, although the entire cluster was not visible in the FOV.

As the telescope was slewed from object to object, it was always necessary to rotate the binoviewers to provide a comfortable view while sitting down. That's because the orientation changed as my wedge-mounted telescope with star diagonal was pointed in different directions.

I returned to the moon and spent some time just enjoying the 3D view. I noticed that details on the moon seemed sharper when using both eyes. In fact, I saw some details on the moon which I had never noticed before. This is a result of the brain doing its magic to improve what you see when using both eyes. To confirm this effect I removed the binoviewers and viewed the moon using one of the 20mm eyepieces. The 3D effect was gone. The image quality was excellent, but the lunar details were not as sharp (due to atmospheric seeing) as when viewing with both eyes.

I did some solar observing using the Binoviewers with the 20mm eyepieces and an 8" full-aperture solar filter. Details on the sun were very distinct even though seeing was pretty bad due to strong breezes and the sun's low altitude in the sky. I added the Barlow Lens; the views were still good. Two eyes are better than one.

I did a check using the Binoviewers with a separate Meade 2X Barlow Lens:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (5)

Viewing the moon using the separate Barlow Lens was effectively the same as with the included William Optics 1.6X Barlow Lens.

I tried to use the Binoviewers with my 3X TeleExtender, but got a surprise. The 1.25" nosepiece of the Binoviewers would not go into the 1.25" eyepiece hole on the TeleXtender! Obviously the Binoviewers nosepiece goes into a 1.25" eyepiece holder since I've used it on my telescopes. My 1.25" eyepieces all fit fine into the TeleXtender. Really odd that the Binoviewers won't work with the TeleXtender.

On another night, prior to moonrise but with some lingering twilight and a brightening sky from the moon, I did some Deep Sky Object (DSO) observing using 20mm (100X on my 8"). M17 (Swan Nebula), low in southwestern sky; shape was visible. The globular clusters M13, M92, and M56 were all very nice. M57 (Ring Nebula) was good. Epsilon Lyrae (Double-Double Star) was a nice view; all four stars were visible with the two close components being nicely separated. The colorful double star Albireo was a beautiful sight with both eyes. M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) seemed to be floating in space; a neat effect from using both eyes. M32 (galaxy) was visible, but M110 (galaxy) was difficult due to its faintness and the brightening moonlit sky. M27 (Dumbbell Nebula) also seemed to be floating in space. And one side of the "dumbbell" appeared to be closer to me than the other side. Just another neat side effect of using both eyes. M33 (Triangulum Galaxy) was faintly visible. M76 (Little Dumbbell Nebula) was easily seen with both eyes. The most striking effect of using binocular vision was seen while observing the Double Cluster. Both clusters were visible in the same FOV (barely) but with either cluster centered in the eyepieces an interesting 3D effect became apparent. Brighter stars appeared closer and fainter stars further away. This was due to the brain being tricked into thinking that fainter objects were further away. It may have been a fake 3D look but it was fascinating to see. I am going to enjoy rediscovering many DSOs as seen though the Binoviewers.

All my previous tests with the Binoviewers on the 8" LX200-ACF had been done without a focal reducer. While viewing the Double Cluster I began to wonder about reducing the magnification and increasing the FOV. I added the f/6.3 focal reducer to the 8". Unfortunately I could not reach a focus with the Binoviewers using its 20mm eyepieces on the 2" star diagonal (seen in the above photos). I removed the diagonal and using the visual back alone the Binoviewers did focus. Both clusters of the Double Cluster were well inside the FOV. I added a small 1.25" diagonal to the focal reducer, as seen here:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (6)

I could focus the image, but just barely before running out of focus travel. The view of the Double Cluster at this low magnification was pretty.

While using the focal reducer I also viewed the just past full waning gibbous moon. The entire disk was visible in the FOV. This handheld iPhone 5s afocal photo (full-frame) through one of the 20mm eyepieces gives a good idea of the wide field-of-view while using a focal reducer:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (7)

I removed the focal reducer and did some lunar observing. When I switched back to a single 2" 24mm UWA eyepiece, the views of the moon, while very nice, were rather disappointing by comparison after having used the Binoviewers for lunar observing!

ETX-105PE

As shown below, the Binoviewers fit fine on an ETX-105PE:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (8)

I viewed a nearly full moon using the 20mm eyepieces and no Barlow Lens. The entire lunar disk was inside the FOV, but just barely. The details were sharp all the way to the edge. The 3D effect was not as pronounced on the ETX has it had been on the 8" telescope. Adding the 1.6X Barlow Lens provided great views of the lunar surface. The two-eye sharpness effect was noticeable on the ETX. Viewing of the moon was very comfortable when using both eyes.

I also viewed M13 (Hercules Globular Cluster) and M57 (Ring Nebula) with and without the Barlow Lens. The bright moonlit sky hampered viewing of these DSOs but they were visible. Both were best viewed without the Barlow Lens. On these DSOs the two-eye increase in brightness effect was very evident.

Astrophotography

One might think that having a binoviewer would make doing some types of astrophotography easier. One side could be used for the camera and the other side for centering an object or maybe for even doing manual guiding. I tested this capability to see how viable it would be.

I first tried an iPhone afocal setup:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (9)

That's a live moon image on the iPhone 5s. The earbud/mic volume buttons are used as a remote shutter release for the iPhone. I used two Meade Series 4000 26mm eyepieces from two of my ETX telescopes in the Binoviewers. The iPhone is attached to its eyepiece using my modified MX-1 Afocal Adapter.

With this setup I discovered two minor problems, both of which had easy workarounds. The first problem was that the two "identical" eyepieces were not parfocal. In fact, they were not even close to being parfocal. After focusing the telescope for one eyepiece I had to slide the other eyepiece a short distance outward in its holder to get it to focus. The second problem was that the weight of the phone and adapter would cause the Binoviewers eyepiece holder to rotate (which is how the focus can be matched for both eyepieces). The solution to that problem was to put the adapter in an orientation that did not cause the rotation.

With this setup, afocal astrophotography of objects can be done. Here is the moon, taken with the iPhone 5s:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (10)

Some smartphones and cameras, including small point-n-shoot ones, should work for this type of astrophotography. Guiding on objects for longer exposures should also be possible, as long as your guide eyepiece and your imaging eyepiece can both be focused. Depending on the size of the camera, you may need to adjust the eyepiece separation distance to accommodate your head and camera.

I then tried using my Nikon D7000 DSLR. This is the camera mounted at prime focus (no eyepiece):

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (11)

One problem becomes apparent from the photo: there is no room for your head if you want to have your eye close to the eyepiece. But that was a minor problem compared to the one I experienced when trying to focus the eyepiece. I had to slide the eyepiece entirely out of the eyepiece holder by almost an inch to reach a focus when the image in the camera was in focus. Unless you have a 1.25" extension tube for eyepieces, using the Binoviewers for prime focus astrophotography will not work.

I also tried an eyepiece projection setup using my OPT Camera Adapter:

Cassiopeia Observatory - Review - William Optics Binoviewers (12)

The William Optics 20mm eyepiece that is included with the Binoviewers fit perfectly inside the adapter tube. I could focus the image in the camera, but the other eyepiece needed to be held about a 1/4-inch out of the eyepiece holder to reach focus. I also tried using a 9mm eyepiece in the eyepiece projection adapter. But with the camera in focus, the other eyepiece needed to be 1-inch beyond its holder. Again, an extension tube can eliminate this problem with the non-camera eyepiece. But the size of the camera and your head will dictate whether you can actually look through the eyepiece while the camera is mounted.

Bottom line: you can do some types of astrophotography using binoviewers, but the depending on what accessories you have it may be difficult. And since the object brightness as viewed in each side of the binoviewers is reduced by 50%, if your goal is to do guided exposures you would be better off using an off-axis guider adapter instead of binoviewers.

Summary

The William Optics Binoviewers is a very high quality accessory, both mechnically and optically. Viewing bright and faint objects using both eyes is more comfortable and can even let you see things that you might not have otherwise seen. There is one drawback to owning a binoviewer however. You may want to expand your eyepiece collection so that you have several matching sets of eyepieces for use in the binoviewers. The included 1.6X Barlow Lens and having a focal reducer can help stem this desire, at least for awhile.

You can find more details about the Binoviewers at the William Optics web site.

If you are a dedicated lunar observer, you will absolutely enjoy using high quality binoviewers. This is likely the main reason for purchasing binoviewers. But once you have them you will probably find yourself using them for planet observing and some DSO observing. I know I will.

Comments are welcome using Email. If you are on Twitter you can use the button below to tweet this report to your followers. Thanks.

Cassiopeia Observatory Home Page

Copyright ©2014 Michael L. Weasner / mweasner@me.com
URL = http://www.weasner.com/co/Reviews/2014/WO_Binoviewers/index.html

The left eyepiece was then focused by rotating its eyepiece holder (the right one can also be focused by rotating its holder).. To confirm this effect I removed the binoviewers and viewed the moon using one of the 20mm eyepieces.. Viewing the moon using the separate Barlow Lens was effectively the same as with the included William Optics 1.6X Barlow Lens.. When I switched back to a single 2" 24mm UWA eyepiece, the views of the moon, while very nice, were rather disappointing by comparison after having used the Binoviewers for lunar observing!. The second problem was that the weight of the phone and adapter would cause the Binoviewers eyepiece holder to rotate (which is how the focus can be matched for both eyepieces).. I could focus the image in the camera, but the other eyepiece needed to be held about a 1/4-inch out of the eyepiece holder to reach focus.. And since the object brightness as viewed in each side of the binoviewers is reduced by 50%, if your goal is to do guided exposures you would be better off using an off-axis guider adapter instead of binoviewers.

So, I ask, which eyepieces have you tried, or own that are good for these binoviewers without serious vignetting of the field?. So, you own a pair of WO binoviewers?. So, I ask, which eyepieces have you tried, or own that are good for these binoviewers without serious vignetting of the field?. So, you own a pair of WO binoviewers?. You may use any regular Plossl eyepiece up to 25-26mm with very good results and no vignetting.

(Video) William Optics Binoviewers -- The best budget binoviewer available?. What eyepieces should you use with a binoviewer?. Improved detail – Some optic tests suggest a good binoviewer can improve the detail of your images by 40%-60%.. Binoviewers work best on telescopes with plenty of back focus... If the eyepiece connects in the middle or in the upper half of the body of the telescope (like most reflectors/Newtonians), your telescope has a low back focus and you might not benefit much from a binoviewer.. Barrel Size 1.25″ Optical Path 4″ (100mm) Clear Aperture 20.2mm Includes eyepieces Yes Includes Barlow Lens Yes RatingPrice William Optics is one of the manufacturers with the best optical devices in the market, but they are sometimes forgotten because they are a small company and sometimes it is hard to find their products on stock.. (Video) William Optics Binoviewers -- The best budget binoviewer available?.. So what eyepieces should you get?.. I think these are definitely some of the best telescope eyepieces out there regardless of price... Also known as binocular telescopes (especially the very high magnification versions), these usually giant binoculars are most usually designed for long distance observation, plane spotting and in particular for astronomy.. Apart from the obvious size difference, most giant astronomy binoculars look like your standard bin, however there are a small selection that like many telescopes and spotting scopes come with angled eyepieces.. Straight Through Eyepieces Straight through "Observation binoculars" will perform best as a long range terrestrial binocular where your view will be not too far from the horizontal most of the time.. Angled Eyepieces Usually this angle is set at either 45° or 90° to the barrels and as you can see from the image to the right, basically this setup makes it a whole lot easier to look through them whilst the objectives are pointed upwards.. Two Objectives Better than One Also remember that with two objective lenses, the optical device is also able to collect more light than a single barrel scope, which in turn also means sending more light to your eyes for a better quality and brighter image..

Ich habe eine Frage zwecks der oben aufgeführten Okulare die zusammen preisgünstig kommen mit dem Binoviewer von William Optics.Sind die Ok?Ich hab null Ahnung, kann auch keine revelanten Informationen finden im Internet.Die einzige Info die ich habe kommt aus dem Buch: Choosing and Using Astronomical Eyepieces by William Paolini.Da werden die Okulare verglichen mit verschiedenen anderen Klonen, ohne am Ende was zu wissen.. Aber die 20er steht nichts gross drüber, man weiss nicht ein mal was da drinnen sitzt oder halt ob die das Wert sind zu besitzen und regelmässig zu benutzen, um damit ordentlich sehen zu können mit so einem Binoviewer.Auf englisch sprachigen Foren wird viel gutes gesagt, na ist ja schön, aber meistens halt auch was übertrieben und so typisch Ami,(ich hab nichts gegn diese leute um das mal nebenbei zusagen, das das keiner hier falsch versteht).So ich hab in der selben Brennweite ein par Okulare, wie mein aller erstes zugelegtes Omegon SWA 20mm, danach hatte ich ein ´Upgrade`auf das 21er Panorama2 auch von Omegon, und steckte auch einmal ein 20mm APM 100º Klotz in mein Okularauszug, zum ausprobieren.. Die Lichtstärke die ich empfunden habe von den 2Zoll Okularen hat selbstverständlich nichts zu Vergleichen mit den 1.25" oben beiden Okularen.Ich war nur entzückt und erstaunt über die Kapazität der 2" Okulare, ins besonderen bei dem Panorama2, das ich auch jetzt habe.Also die Frage ist fürs beidäugige Beobachten, nach des zufriedenstellendem Omegon SWA 20mm 70º 1,25" Okulars, was wäre die visuelle Experience mit den 20mm William Optics 66º?Hat da jemand Erfahrung mit den Okularen, oder kann ein Forumteilnehmer mir seine Opinion geben mit den anderen oben aufgeführten Okularen?Ich werde keine Probleme mit dem Backfokus haben, hab zwischen 240-270mm Backfokus, Refraktor wie Spiegel"ei"!Entschuldigen sie bitte mein zusammengematschtes deutsch mit irsinnigen gramatischen Fehlern, die Schrift war noch nie meine Sache, war immer schon besser in Mathe und Physiks, und dazu lebe ich seit mehr als drei Jahrzehnten nicht mehr in Deutschland, also bitte um Verständniss für meine halb Englisch, Französische und Spanische Aussprachsweise.Vielen dank im voraus,. Ich frage hier nach um mir auszurechnen/vorzustellen ob sich das Komplettpacket lohnt bei William Optics wo die Okulare mit 1.6x Verlängerung inhalten ist.Im Prinzip wollte ich die ganze Sache auf einem Herschelkeil benutzen ohne 1.6x Verlängerunglinse.. Ich werde rechnerisch 235mm Intravel brauchen, mit dem 2" Baader Herschelkeil erwarte da keine Probleme bei einem ED 4" f11 1122mm Refraktor.Werde so bei der Sonne mit meinem langbrennweitigen ED Refraktor um die 56fache Vergrösserung haben bei 1.8mm Austrittspupille mit dem Baader 540nm Solar Continuum Filter auf dem 2"Herschelkeil.. Ausserdem bin ich überzeugt das ich auf einem "gutmütigen" f11 Teleskop die Sach auf anhib klappt.Mir ist klar das das nicht sehr viel an Vergrösserung ist für die Sonne im Continuum 540nm Bereich, wenn ich mehr möchte sollten da noch ein par kurzbrennweitige Okulare dazukommen später, oder vieleicht mit meiner 2" 2x ED Barlow(Gurke visuell) auch mal probieren, ist ja auch noch die 1.6x fache Verlängerung mit dabei.. Persöhnlich bin ich mehr Überzeugt von Okularen als Barlows visuell.Als erste Hand habe ich als Vergleichbare Referenz an Okularen ein 38mm 2" 70º, 21mm 2" 100º, 20mm 1.25" 70º, 9mm 2" 100º, 5.5mm 1.25" 62º, und ein Fadenkreuz 24mm 55º 1.25" Okular(für den Sucher).In Kontrast und Schärfe kann man das irgendwo vergleichen?Kam auf die Idee beidäugig bei der Sonne, weil ich denke wenn man mit beiden Augen auf einmal beobachten kann, wird das ganze entspannter/konzentrierter und kann mit links das umgebene Licht am helligsten Tag(morgens/abends ab ~20º Höhe der Sonne) dann drosslen ohne mir den Kopf mitten im Sommer mit meinem schwarzen dünnen Tuch zu bedecken.. Hallo Robert,Klasse, danke für ihre Meinung, tut immer gut was positives zu höhren, und dazu noch Gerätespezifisch zu dem WO Binowiewer.Auch was die Anatomie betrifft, hab ich nicht mal drangedacht!, da ich meine Brille gerne bei der Nase was grösser habe.. Hallo Uwe,Danke für den Tip nur den Bino anzuschaffen und dann ein par Hyperionzooms dranzumachen.Leider bin ich nicht von Zooms überzeugt, ich hatte mal vor 10Jahren ein LeicaZoom, auf nem 80erLeica ED, und das Teil war nichts.. ), und bei so einem Preis gehe ich direkt zu einem Televue festbrennweite, da kann ich nichts falschmachen was die Qualität belangt.Ich lass mir einfach mal zukommen die beiden die im "Packet" dazukommen, das gibt dann, 56x mit 1.2º Gesichtsfeld bei 1.8mm AP.. Bei 66º sind die Okulare auch nicht zu schlimm, auch wenn ich zwei andere gut brauchbare Okulare habe fürs Monokulare Beobachten, die mir bei der Sonne im Moment bei meinem derzeitigen Achromaten 56x un 90x geben.Sicher nachdem die dann bald da sind zusammen mit dem langen neuen ED Rohr, kommt dann noch zwei kurzbrennweitige Okulare dazu zulegen.Dachte mir zwischen 11 und 12mm Brennweite(1-1,1mmAP), muss noch sehen ob ich auch das riskieren könnte eine etwas kleinere AP mir da anzuquälen.. Hab ein 5.5mm hier, somit wird erst einmal mit dem probiert(0.5mmAP), danach wird entschieden.Die meist empholenen die ich bis jetzt gesehen habe waren die Pentax SMC XF 12mm 1.25" 60º mit 18mm Augenabstand, fast besser sicher sind die Nagler/Delite..., aber mir zu teuer der Nagler/Delitepreis x2!Nach dem Kauf zweier von denen bin ich dann"delite", einiges leichter, ne kommt nicht in die Kiste.Mal gucken ob da was noch anderes sinvolles sich finden lässt.

The sample fluid contains particulates that are labeled with immunomagnetic beads and the labeled particulates are attracted by the magnetic force generated by the magnetic attraction unit to retain in the inner reservoir or the separation chamber.. Abstract: Disclosed is a micro-hole structure and a method for forming the micro-hole.. Abstract: Disclosed is a disk based platform for separating and detecting cells that are labeled with immunomagnetic beads.. The first ring-shaped electrodes, and the second ring-shaped electrodes are located on the surface of the substrate alternately in each PIRE.. BIOCHIP SYSTEM, METHOD FOR DETERMINING SPERM QUALITY AND METHOD FOR SEPARATING SPERM. The detector generates a signal upon one sperm in the semen sample passing through the shrunk portion.. The sample fluid contains particulates that are labeled with immunomagnetic beads and the labeled particulates are attracted by the magnetic force generated by the magnetic attraction unit to retain in the inner reservoir or the separation chamber.. (Video) Provisional Patent Applications: What They Are and Why They Matter. Publication date: September 9, 2010. Abstract: Disclosed is a micro-hole structure and a method for forming the micro-hole.. (Video) How to patent your invention idea. The first ring-shaped electrodes, and the second ring-shaped electrodes are located on the surface of the substrate alternately in each PIRE.. MICRO-VORTEX GENERATOR. What Do Patent Numbers Look Like?

The Baader zoom apparent field of view varies between 50° and 68° while the Celestron varies between 60° and 40° (according to Baader and Celestron respectively).. Celestron #93230 8-24mm and Meade 4000 Zooms. In my experience they were no better than the Celestron and Meade 4000 zooms.. It is not quite as good as the Baader Hyperion Mark IV zoom which is the best of the zooms I can afford.. I would still (based on my own experience buying from Vixen NA direct) recommend the Vixen LV zoom if the Baader Hyperion Mark IV was too pricey.. This particular eyepiece is made in China, the Vixen LV Zoom that is.

Corporate In a relatively short time, William Optics has established itself and its products as one of the world leaders in short-tube, highly-portable refractors, and has achieved quality recognition for many accessories such as the well celebrated WO Diagonals.. In the coming year, you will have many pleasant surprises: on top of a whole new range of larger Apochromatic telescopes, we will begin marketing new accessories and binoculars for all pockets.. There are now few countries where a serious stargazer cannot appreciate the optical and mechanical excellence of a William Optics telescope.. With more than 70 Authorized WO Dealers in 35 countries, and a production base in the most advanced countries for optical and mechanical technologies (USA, Germany, Japan, Russia, Taiwan), we can guarantee a prompt customer service and prices no other high-quality brand can afford.. Our philosophy of “More quality for Less money” is aimed at making instruments outside the reach of the average pocket, such as apochromatic refractors, affordable and easy to get hold of for anybody who wants to.. I remember one time in 1979, when I borrowed my grandma’s glasses and used a cheap eyepiece from my school’s old retired microscope to make my first telescope.. I was so amazed and inspired by the CEO of Takahashi when he took me on a tour of the factory, and showed me how they make their beautiful top quality [D1] telescopes!. Over the next 2 years I worked very hard, finally starting my own company “William Optics” in 1996.. The goal was very clear - to produce affordable, top quality refractor telescopes that people would be proud to own.. After studying the quality and performance of the Takahashi and AP scopes, I knew that I could make a high-quality APO (Apochromatic Refractor) myself.. I searched for the best materials available and for the best designs for an APO, and gained a great deal of information about making our own APO refractors.. I admire their sheer genius, and their music inspired me to make a refractor that mimics their art.. William Optics never stops in our mission to provide quality, affordable products.

However, not all observers want or need the added complexity of an equatorial mount and an altazimuth mount will do just nicely.. The new Sky-Watcher AZ-EQ6 GT mount gives you a a choice in how you use it as it can be assembled and operated in either equatorial of altazimuth mode.. In altazimuth mode you can even mount two telescopes at the same time using the standard hardware that is supplied with the comprehensive kit.. 12v cigar lighter plugDatabase:42,000+ objectsController:SynScanSupplier:First Light Optics The mount arrived in two sturdy cardboard boxes The first contained the mount with dual Losmandy/Vixen saddle clamp, SynScan handcontroller, holder for the handcontroller, power and data cables, a camera control cable, a 150mm counterbalance extension bar, a robust looking second saddle clamp assembly and some Allen Keys.The second box contained the substantial stainless steel tripod, two 5Kg counterweights and a metal leg-spreader.. The mount ships with its own heavy duty tripod which is identical to that of the original NEQ6 so the mount will fit directly on to observatory piers designed for the earlier mount which is good news for people upgrading from the NEQ6.. The mount sports a 25mm diameter stainless steel counterbalance bar which is 207mm long but can be increased in length by a further 150mm using the supplied extension bar.. These are replaced with a very smoothly operating 16mm diameter hand bolt that works against two swivel blocks, one on the mount base and one on the mount head itself, to produce a very elegant solution to altitude adjustment that is simple to operate one- handed.. The hinged Tommy bar on the end of the altitude adjustment bolt stows neatly away inside the bolt head when it has done its work and once the correct altitude has been selected, two substantial plastic knobs lock the mount head solidly in place.. These encoders remain functional with the clutches disengaged but the mount turned on so you can manually push the telescope about to another part of the sky should you wish to do so and the encoders will keep the system updated with where the mount is currently pointing.. Sky-Watcher have provided a two prong plug and socket system on the new mount that incorporates a locking collar which is a huge improvement on the original and ensures that accidental disconnection cannot happen.. When the mount is used in altazimuth mode, the altitude adjustment bolt is adjusted towards the 90° point where it disengages from the mount’s base swivel at about 88° elevation.. The mount is then locked in place at 90° elevation using a 12mm diameter bolt, which in equatorial mode is retained in a threaded receptacle on the side of the mount.. A single telescope can be mounted in the standard dual-size saddle clamp and counterbalanced with a suitable weight on the counterbalance bar.. However, Sky-Watcher supply a second dual-size saddle clamp that affixes to the counterbalance bar and tightens securely onto a machined flat on the end of the counterbalance bar allowing two telescopes to be installed at the same time.. Factor in the much improved altitude adjustment, new RA and DEC clutches, belt drive, reduced weight and elegant design and this mount becomes a very attractive package indeed.

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Mrs. Angelic Larkin

Last Updated: 08/23/2022

Views: 5319

Rating: 4.7 / 5 (47 voted)

Reviews: 94% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Mrs. Angelic Larkin

Birthday: 1992-06-28

Address: Apt. 413 8275 Mueller Overpass, South Magnolia, IA 99527-6023

Phone: +6824704719725

Job: District Real-Estate Facilitator

Hobby: Letterboxing, Vacation, Poi, Homebrewing, Mountain biking, Slacklining, Cabaret

Introduction: My name is Mrs. Angelic Larkin, I am a cute, charming, funny, determined, inexpensive, joyous, cheerful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.